Borrowing money for college these days seems all but inevitable for everyone but the wealthiest individuals. That is why now more than ever, it is necessary for prospective students to brush up on the subject of student loans so that they can make sound financial decisions. The material below is intended to assist with exactly that.

If you are having a hard time paying back your student loans, call your lender and let them know this. There are normally several circumstances that will allow you to qualify for an extension and/or a payment plan. You will have to furnish proof of this financial hardship, so be prepared.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions about federal loans. Not many people understand what these types of loans can offer or what their regulations and rules are. If you have any questions about these loans, contact your student loan adviser. Funds are limited, so talk to them before the application deadline.

If you have the ability to pay more than what you owe on your loans, try to get those with the highest interest taken care of first. If your payment is based on what loans are the highest or lowest, there’s a chance you’ll be owing more at the end.

Prioritize your loan repayment schedule by interest rate. The one carrying the highest APR should be dealt with first. You will get all of your loans paid off faster when putting extra money into them. You will not be penalized for speeding up your repayment.

For those having a hard time with paying off their student loans, IBR may be an option. This is a federal program known as Income-Based Repayment. It can let borrowers repay federal loans based on how much they can afford instead of what’s due. The cap is about 15 percent of their discretionary income.

Try getting your student loans paid off in a 10-year period. This is the traditional repayment period that you should be able to achieve after graduation. If you struggle with payments, there are 20 and 30-year repayment periods. The drawback to these is that they will make you pay more in interest.

It may be frightening to consider adding student loans to your bills if your money is already tight. Loan rewards programs can help a little with this, however. Look at websites such as SmarterBucks and LoanLink to learn about this kind of program offered by Upromise. These are similar to cash back programs in which you earn rewards for each dollar you spend, and you can apply those rewards toward your loan.

To use your student loan money wisely, shop at the grocery store instead of eating a lot of your meals out. Every dollar counts when you are taking out loans, and the more you can pay of your own tuition, the less interest you will have to pay back later. Saving money on lifestyle choices means smaller loans each semester.

Try to make your student loan payments on time. If you miss your payments, you can face harsh financial penalties. Some of these can be very high, especially if your lender is dealing with the loans through a collection agency. Keep in mind that bankruptcy won’t make your student loans go away.

Never sign any loan documents without reading them first. This is a big financial step and you do not want to bite off more than you can chew. You need to make sure that you understand the amount of the loan you are going to receive, the repayment options and the rate of interest.

Starting to pay off your student loans while you are still in school can add up to significant savings. Even small payments will reduce the amount of accrued interest, meaning a smaller amount will be applied to your loan upon graduation. Keep this in mind every time you find yourself with a few extra bucks in your pocket.




To bring in the greatest returns on your student loan, get the most out of each day at school. Instead of sleeping in until a few minutes before class, and then running to class with your binder and notebook flying, wake up earlier to get yourself organized. You’ll get better grades and make a good impression.

Don’t pass up the opportunity to score a tax interest deduction for your student loans. This deduction is good for up to $2,500 of interest paid on your student loans. You can even claim this deduction if you do not submit a fully itemized tax return form. This is especially useful if your loans carry a higher interest rate.

It seems that hardly any young student nowadays can complete a degree program without incurring at least some student loan debt. However, when armed with the right type of knowledge on the topic, making smart choices about loans really can be easy. Using the tips found in the paragraphs above is a great way to start.

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